Let's Dish With Linda Lou

Sharing My Recipes, My Life, And The Food Tale Of Two Cities

How To Cook and Open A Lobster


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Today was a really fun day! Tonya, a good friend of mine, went with to shop for seafood. I think she was somewhat surprised to see me stick my hand right into the lobster tank.

This is one of those posts that may not be easy for everyone to read.  Most all shellfish, should be alive before cooking.  This makes it really hard for a lot of people to handle. BEING HUMANE IS KEY!

I’ve worked for many years cooking and handling lobsters, blue crab, shrimp, mussels, and clams. The fresher the seafood, the better the finished dish is going to be.

The Lobster Institute has come up with a study. The study reads… lobsters, like insects, do not have complex brains that allow them to process pain like humans other animals do. They have compared it to when you kill a mosquito. Cooking a lobster, in the practical sennse, is like killing a big bug.

Let’s get back to cooking and opening a lobster. Once I bring the lobster(s) home, I make sure they are kept in the bag with some crushed ice. You want to cook them as soon as possible. Before placing them into the pot of boiling water, I put them to sleep. This is something I learned when I worked at a seafood restaurant.

Place the lobster face (head) down on a counter, tail end in the air. Cross their arms and claws, then rub the back side of their shell, in an up and down motion. In about 45 seconds, their legs and antenna will stop moving. The lobster will then be asleep.  Balancing on their heads, by themselves on the counter. If you want to see how this is done,  just google “How to put a lobster to sleep”, and there are videos available.

I make sure that the water is salted, with sprigs of fresh tarragon, and at a hard boil. Next,  I place the sleeping lobster, head first, immediately  into the boiling water. You’ll notice that the lobster is not totally submerged. I prefer to let steam and water cook the lobster. Place a tight-fitting lid on the pot. Using a dish towel, I hold on to the lid for a about 10 seconds before letting go.

Below is a peek to show you how I do this.

In a very large stock pot I place water and tarragon into water. On high heat, I bring the water up to a hard boil. I place the sleeping lobster into the boiling water then place the lid on, holding it with a towel for around 10 seconds.

Once cooked, I lift the lobster up using large tongs to release any excess water the lobster may hold, back into the pot. Next, I place the lobster into a large plastic container to cool before removing the meat.

Once cooled, first I take off the rubber bands from the claws. I remove the arms with the claws. Next, I twist off the tail to release from the body, also known as the thorax. I discard the thorax.

There are two ways to remove the meat from the tail. First is to bend, in a backwards direction. Now the very end of the tail meat is showing. Use a pair of scissors and cut down the inner side of the tail to release the meat. The other way is to squeeze to tail together until you hear the back side snap. Turn the tail over, where the underbelly is facing in the upwards direction. Using two hands, split the tail open.

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There is a piece of that needs to be removed on the outer side of the tail meat. It’s really a bit fibrous, just discard. You can see above, the indention it leaves on the backside of the tail meat. The tail is now clean and done. Next, the claws.

This is where a good pair of lobster cracker comes in. Even a meat mallet comes in handy. One of the claws in larger and harder to crack than the other one. You may need some help with that one, that’s why I mention the meat mallet. Lay a towel over the larger claw and hit it one time. That should put a crack into the claw and make it easier to remove the meat in one piece. When using the crackers, be careful not to crack the meat, just the shell. The is insure the meat will come out in one piece. For the arms, they can be a bit tricky. They have knuckles and meat can get caught in them. If you don’t have a lobster pick, you can use a large skewer to help get that meat out.

How’s this for a finished dish! Great to take to parties.  For this recipe, type in key words Shrimp Scampi, into the search bar, at the top right corner, of my home page. My recipe will pop up. The only change is that I incorporated cooked lobster to the dish.

Lobster And Shrimp Scampi Over Linguine (1)

Large stock pot with lid (8 to 16 quart pot)
Cook Time: 8-10 minutes per pound (Cooked lobster should be vibrant red in color)
Prep Time:
Allow for time to put lobster to sleep as explained above. 5-7 minutes to bring water to a hard boil.

1 live 2 pound lobster
1-1/2 quarts of water
2 heaping tablespoons of Kosher salt
3 sprigs of fresh tarragon.

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Mocha Chili Spiced Roasted Asparagus- P.S. Flavor- Artisanal Spice Blends


Pam Smith’s daughter Nicole, and my daughter Melissa are long time friends. Once I really got into blogging about my recipes, it was important for me to acknowledge those people who inspire me. Pam Smith is at the top of my list. She started out in the area of nutrition, had her own radio program, and now is affiliated with Epcot. She has developed her own line of spice blends and rubs that are AMAZING! My daughter and I have watched her narrate cooking demos, with well known chefs at the EPCOT Food And Wine Festival. Now Pam has gone on to perform her own food demos with her daughter Nicole narrating them by her side. What a tremendous family achievement.


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I received an early Christmas package from the girls and was so excited to test a recipe out using this Mocha Chili Spice blend.  I decided to roast some asparagus using the Mocha Chili.


Mocha Chili Spiced Roasted Asparagus (4)

Equipment: 1 1/4 sheet pan
Yields: 2 servings
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10-12 minutes (time may vary depending on thickness of asparagus)
1 pound of Asparagus
2 tablespoons of Mocha Chili Spice Blend
1 tablespoon Kosher salt
1/4 cup olive oil

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Rinse the Asparagus under cold water first. Next, dry all the spears off really well.  Once they are all dry, hold each one at both ends, and where they naturally break off, discard the bottom portion.
Place asparagus onto sheet pan. Next, add the Mocha Chili, Kosher salt, and olive oil. Using clean hands, toss the asparagus spears so they are coated really well. Then spread them out evenly into one layer so they roast nicely.  WOW!, they were so delicious. The Mocha Chili gave the asparagus such a unique flavor profile. For more information visit…

           P.S. Flavor- Spice Blends by Pam Smith, RDN.
Pam Smith will be teaching monthly online classes to go along with the P.S. Flavor Club. Available are 3 month seasonal kits, you can go to http://www.psflavorclub.com.

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Antipasto Platters Made Easy

Antipasto Platters

Antipasto Platters (2)

Antipasto Platters (3)

Whenever I’m doing an antipasto platter, buy the best ingredients I can find,  I like to  assemble them and dress a few of them. For example; the Bocconcini (mini mozzarella balls) I like to add flavorings, the artichokes can be tossed with strips of roasted red peppers, and the cantaloupe and bread sticks, wrap with some delicious meats. Keeping the same items together gives a more uniform look to the platter. I also always try to utilize herbs from my garden. Here I’m using fresh basil as a garnish for the platters.

Dress the grape tomatoes with E.V.O.O. and a sprinkle of Kosher salt.

What’s great is that all the ingredients are store bought so it makes these platters fast and easy to put together. For the seasoned Bocconcini, the recipe is really simple. These platters required for me to double the recipe below.

Marinate For Bocconcini:
1-8 ounce package of mini Bocconcini
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1 tablespoon dried parsley flakes
Pinch of Kosher salt
Pinch of freshly cracked black pepper
1/4 cup of E.V.O.O.

Separate all the mini mozzarella balls and place them into a small bowl along with the rest of the ingredients. Using a spoon, gently mix together.

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Copper Chef

Let's DishThis pan is so


Copper Chef

I saw the advertisement for this pan and I fell in love.  What really attracted me to it was the fact it needed no oil at all for sauteing, WOW!  The other perks were the glass tempered lid, deep fryer attachment and the steamer plate. Seriously, you can cook pretty much anything in this pan with its high sides and transfer to the oven due to the metal handle. Nothing sticks due to its construction of the pan.

I’m going to be testing out of few of my recipe in the pan using no oil to see how it works. Watch for that to show up where I print the ingredients for my recipes. I will post the amount of oil you’ll need if using traditional saute pans or sauce pots.

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